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Belly Dancing Instructor

Alexandra Treiber trained and studied five years at the Conservatory for Music, Film and Dance (school affiliated with the Munich Opera House) in Munich, Germany with Gustav Blanc, Michel de Lutry and Mme. Brunner.

Intensively studied with Mideastern dance masters Yousry Sharif, Ibrahim Farrah, Mahmoud Reda, Jemela Omar, Elena Lentini and Anahid Sofian.

Studied ballet in New York City at the New York School of Ballet with Richard Thomas, Barbara Fallis, Dick Andros and Eleonore Treiber.

Studied jazz with Luigi in New York City and Jackie Loto in Tampa.

Studied ballet with Lester Jacobsen and Suzanne Pomerantzeff in St. Petersburg

Minored in dance at the University of South Florida in Tampa and St. Petersburg Junior College

Former member of the Tampa Jazz Dance Company and SPJC Dance Company

Alexandra has performed across the US, in Dubai, Egypt, England and Germany.

Starting formal dance training at age 8 in classical ballet and jazz (and a little bit of modern), she furthered her artistry after intensively studying with many of the world's leading Mideastern "Raqs Sharqi" masters.

She has produced many workshops and shows, including "Ancient Dance- Modern Woman", has taught for the Marcia P. Hoffman Performing Arts Institute in its arts educational outreach program; and taught belly dance at Safety Harbor Spa from 1992-2019. In 2000, she was a guest teacher at the Pyramids Spa in Dubai and guest performer at several venues in the UAE (including in the desert)

Alexandra also was a featured performer at the "Alexander the Great" and "Splendors of Ancient Egypt" in St, Petersburg, FL and at the Middle Eastern  Dance Hall of Fame in New York City.

Among innumerable engagements at private functions (mostly weddings) and special appearances, one of her favorites was a performance with Gypsies at a national theatre in Budapest, Hungary

Alexandra has performed across the US, in Dubai, Egypt, England and Germany.

Starting formal dance training at age 8 in classical ballet and jazz (and a little bit of modern), she furthered her artistry after intensively studying with many of the world's leading Mideastern "Raqs Sharqi" masters.

She has produced many workshops and shows, including "Ancient Dance- Modern Woman", has taught for the Marcia P. Hoffman Performing Arts Institute in its arts educational outreach program; and taught belly dance at Safety Harbor Spa from 1992-2019. In 2000, she was a guest teacher at the Pyramids Spa in Dubai and guest performer at several venues in the UAE (including in the desert)

Alexandra also was a featured performer at the "Alexander the Great" and "Splendors of Ancient Egypt" in St, Petersburg, FL and at the Middle Eastern  Dance Hall of Fame in New York City.

Among innumerable engagements at private functions (mostly weddings) and special appearances, one of her favorites was a performance with Gypsies at a national theatre in Budapest, Hungary.



About Belly Dance

Belly Dance is an ancient art, perhaps the most ancient, tracing its origins to India, where dance was a sacred ritual and actual form of worship.

The very word "dance" originates from the Sanskrit "tanha" meaning "joy of life", whilst the Arabic word "Raqs" and Turkish word "Rakkase" both trace their etymology to the Assyrian word " Rakadu", which means "to celebrate.".

Known by other names such as "Raqs Sharqi", "Danse Orientale" and Mideastern Dance, this dance form has evolved throughout centuries from sacred ritual to folklore and finally into secular entertainment.

Raqs Sharqi (means dance of the East) and Danse Orientale (dance of the Orient).

It is important to note that it has endured centuries and spread to most of the world, but oddly enough remains largely uncodified unlike other dance arts.

However, you know when you see and experience "the real thing."

During the 1800s, many Europeans traveled to the Mideast, which was then referred to as the "Orient." Hence, those who documented their observations through painting and literature, are known today as "Orientalists."

Furthermore, as many of the Orientalists were French or French-speaking (partially due to Napolean's exploits), the terms Danse Orientale and Danse du Ventre (dance of the belly) evolved.

Folkloric style is referred to as "Beledi", which means "of my country" in Arabic.

Alas, one can draw one's own conclusion as to the origin of the name Belly Dance.

Having survived the ages, this legitimate art form is deserving of appreciation despite negative perceptions or myths about it and its origins; albeit unfortunately due to unauthentic, badly or untrained modern-day representations.

Far from the reaches of India, the Gypsies or Rom (very briefly stated) carried the dance west. First through Persia, perhaps through the Arabian desert and/or through the Causcas Mountains, then to Turkey and Egypt as well as far as Europe.

Regardless its name, this dance art has survived the ages and evolved into distinct styles with different, beautiful music that has often found its way into western, modern-day music.

The better known and popular styles today are Egyptian, Turkish and Lebanese.

But it's important to remember that each country or region has its own individual folkloric and theatrical styles

In the last 30 years or so, "tribal-fusion" has evolved among many American dancers.

In addition to one's body as the main instrument, dancers use zils (finger cymbals)l, also known as zagat; tambourines, drums, veils, candles, canes and yes, even snakes.

Belly Dance continues to evolve and grow in popularity in the West given its beauty, body-sculpting benefits and empowering feelings of joy and freedom.

 

May you feel and experience the sense of joy Raqs Sharqi dance and music instill; and gain appreciation for this ancient yet modern and true art form.